Movie News

 2017: April-June



  Targeted 'research'...

New Zealand film censor surveys feminists, anti-sex work campaigners, police and academics to find that child protection issues re sexual violence in the media can be mitigated by extending film censorship to the internet


Link Here 14th April 2017
oflc sexual violence New Zealand's film censors of the OFLC are calling for the extension of their remit to internet streaming services such as Lightbox and Netflix.

Currently, apart from some one-off cases, the New Zealand censor has no influence over the labelling and warnings that come with streamed content.

Deputy chief censor Jared Mullen claimed that the public wanted such services too be censored by the OFLC:

Forty-seven percent of New Zealanders are now accessing streaming services regularly - that's at least weekly. So I think it is becoming more a part of New Zealanders lives and parents and young people are telling us the same thing. Their expectations for content labelling are high, they want more specific information and they want that before they watch the show.

Ninety-two percent of Kiwis who are responsible for choosing entertainment for children actually use the classification and labels, which is an extraordinary number.

Mullen said the participants involved in new research generally agreed that content regulation laws should be extended to cover increasingly popular streaming services. However this is hardly surprising when noting that the surveyed group were feminist campaigners, anti-sex work campaigners, police and feminist dominated academia.

Mullen noted that the groups were canvassed:

On their views of firstly what they're seeing in terms of sexual violence portrayal in entertainment media, and how they are seeing it effect young people. The concern across all of those groups is the portrayal of sexual violence... is often unrealistic, it can be sensationalised and is often portraying some really harmful myths about sexual violence which don't accord with reality.

Asked about the legal practicalities of extending film censorship to the internet, Mullen said there were half a dozen pieces of legislation that would need changing:

Relatively easy amendments - there's a range of regulations that would need to change, but other than that, no - it's not difficult.

 

 Offsite Article: It's not so funny for some...


Link Here 7th April 2017
it 2017 Professional clowns slam the remake of Stephen King's It as 'disgusting' and claim the horror film's child-killer Pennywise could force them out of business

See article from dailymail.co.uk